“The Dots” Newsletter 2014

The Dots… News from BOBSA

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the Black  Dots

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BOBSA
Newsletter  
  
August 2014

 

Volume III, Issue 3

In This Issue
Military Discriminates Against Back
Hairstyles
The Black Box Caddy
Women Profiled in Stores
Has the Korean Beauty Industry Reached
its Summit?
BOBSA Goes Global
Words of Wisdom
Trailer to Movie “Addicted”
From Kitchen Chemist to Business
Owner
Black Women Angry About Asian
Dominance
Black Women on Quest to Strip Asian
Dominance

Quick
Links

Featured
Article

Princess Hill and
Kelly
Williams

 

 

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 Military
Discriminates Against Black Hairstyles

Recently, I was in my local VA office
when I ran across this article in a military
magazine. I was stunned by the article. African
American enlisted females worry about family
members they leave behind, the threats of war,
being targets of rape, and now they are being
attacked for wearing hairstyles like braids and
twists that do not meet military guidelines and
standards.The Pentagon said the military
would review controversial grooming policies that
led some to accuse the Army of racial bias.
Grooming guidelines released in late March, known
as Army Regulation 670-1, included rules on hair
grooming. Among the “unauthorized styles” were
natural hairstyles popular among African American
women, including twists. A White House petition,
asking the Army to reconsider the ban, gathered
more than 10,000 signatures.

Thank you to
the women members of the Congressional Black
Caucus for standing up for African American
military women and Secretary Hagel for asking the
military to review the guidelines. Click here to read the article in the
Washington Post.

Michelle
Carter
Editor

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The Black Box
Caddy is a Self Service
Operation
The
Black Box Barber Caddy® is the first of its kind
to allow Barber Shops and Salons servicing male
clients the opportunity to purchase hair care
products during their routine appointments.
Specializing in products for men, The Black Box
Barber Caddy® saves clients time and extra trips
while also benefiting owners because of its
Self-service operation. Male clients will
appreciate the convenience of having all of their
staple hair care products at their fingertips and
owners can experience the satisfaction of being
the one place for all of their clients’ hair care
needs.

Michelle
Carter

Women
Profiled in Stores
Why do African Americans continue to support
businesses that insult, disrespect and humiliate
us?  Go to the links below to read a few
examples of businesses that profiled and assaulted
customers and what you can do when you feel your
civil liberties have been abused.  We need to
stop giving these businesses our money and just go
natural.  Can we blame them for laughing at
us all the way to the bank?
PORTSMOUTH, Va. (WAVY) -Candice Colley and
Tonya Williams decided to get some hair for a new
style in Portsmouth things went downhill
fast.  It all started as they were looking
around the store and Tonya’s daughter picked up a
bottle of cream. When they left to price check at
other stores they asked the clerk to hold on to a
bundle of hair until they returned, leaving the
cream behind as well.  When they got back,
they say they were accused of committing a
crime.  Click here for additional
details.

 

DALLAS (CBS 11 NEWS) – An North Texas woman
says her civil rights were violated at an
Arlington beauty supply store after she was
racially profiled, falsely accused of stealing,
then beaten by the store’s owner.  The
shameful attach on this women is found by clicking
here.
Michelle Carter

Editor

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 Has
the Korean Beauty Industry
Reached its Summit?
– Part I 
  
by Dr. Tony
Lloneau
The
Korean Beauty Supply Industry is very strong. In
fact, the largest beauty supply network in this
country is Korean. Jenny’s Beauty Supply with 9
distribution warehoused in 9 major cities is a
strong example. Sally’s Beauty Supply is the
largest beauty supply chain of stores in America,
with over 2,300 stores in the U.S. But
collectively, the Koreans have over three times
that many.  Most are bigger and stock a
larger variety of products, including local and
regional products. However, the Korean stores for
the most part are located in mostly Afro American
communities. The reason for this is because the
main focus of sales are for commercial hair, i.e.
wigs, hair for weaves, braids, extensions and all
forms of hair augmentations.  Afro American
women are the major consumers of these items.The Koreans control the major source of
import of this hair through their homeland of
Korea. Afro Americans are only 12% of the
country’s population, but are consumers of over
33% of hair care products in America.  These
facts make for good business sense for the Korean
Beauty Supply Stores to be located in the Afro
communities. One little known interesting fact is,
Koreans control 60% of the beauty supply industry
in America, but they are only 3% of the
population.

With the preceding in mind,
this leads us to the reason for this article. When
the Korean’s first came to this country in groups
after the Korean War and the North Korean conflict
in the late 1960s, they discovered the
demographics of commercial hair and the
correlation of hair and hair care products as it
related to the Afro consumer, and they opened
stores in the predominately Afro communities to
service that demographic. At first the community
was apprehensive and untrusting of the Koreans
whom they felt had infiltrated their turf. Also,
most of the Koreans could not speak English, so
communication was difficult. But because the
Korean stores had what the populist wanted and
needed without having to go outside of the area
and at competitive prices, the blending of the two
cultures over time became compatible.

The
first generations of Koreans overcame the many
barriers of doing business in a somewhat hostile
environment dating back to the late 60’s and early
70’s. The second generation for the most part
assimilated into the family business and the
language barrier became less of a concern in the
late 80’s and mid 90’s. But when the third
generation came on the scene, many of them had
other goals and ambitions that did not include the
beauty supply business. This was the beginning of
the slowdown of the Korean dominated beauty supply
business. Many of this generation went to colleges
and universities and came out with skills and
diplomas that related to high tech industries and
professional careers. In fact, Asians are the
second largest minority enrolled in institutes of
higher learning in America.

Michelle
Carter

Editor

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BOBSA
Goes Global
Please join BOBSA in celebrating our newest
partnership with GABBSO (Ghana Association of
Barbering and Barbering Salon Owners). We look
forward to your continued support as we increase
our social responsibility. GABBSO visited OSU
Children’s Home, an orphanage in Ghana’s capital.
The association provided free haircuts for
approximately 200 children and also donated items
and funds. This is BOBSA’s first step in unifying
the African-American industry world-wide.
The association has been in existence for 19
years and has a membership of 1200 nationwide that
is in all the ten regions of Ghana. Each region
consists of a zonal and regional and the zonal is
under the regional executive and the regional is
also under the national executive. As a zonal
Chairman of my zone, I, along with my zonal
executives, make sure every member does what is
required of him as a member.
For more information on how you can support
BOBSA and GABBSO visit: http://www.bobsa.org/?utm_source=Copy+of+The+Dots+08%2F2014+&utm_campaign=BOBSA+QR-Code+bobsa6&utm_medium=archive
or call (650) 863-3491.

Michelle
Carter

Editor

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Words
of Wisdom From Shaneka Brown
Shaneka
Hammond Brown reminds us, “Don’t get discouraged
because someone else may get it before you, just
wait a bigger blessing is being prepared! Just
stay FOCUS! !!! Your hard work is paying off!”

Michelle Carter

Editor

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Trailer
for Movie “Addicted”
ADDICTED
(Oct 10) is based on the New York Times
best-selling book by Zane, and starring Sharon
Leal, Boris Kodjoe, Tyson Beckford, Tasha Smith,
Kat Graham & William Levy.  To watch the
trailer, click here.

Michelle Carter

Editor

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 From
Kitchen Chemist to Business Owner
LaKrishia
Armour writes about the upside and downside of
starting a hair care business.  Dr. Paula
Chrishon, who owns the Tendrils and Curls™
boutique in Houston, TX, says that black women
have tremendous buying power and the hair care and
beauty industry along with the increase in
E-commerce gives many women the chance to move
from simply daydreaming about entrepreneurship to
becoming kitchen chemists, running small
businesses, to transitioning into CEOs.
“Time and time again, these products are developed
in the kitchens of black women who are making
every effort to remedy an issue they are
experiencing with their own hair,” says Chrishon.
 

Michelle
Carter

Editor

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Black Women Angry About Asian
Dominance
Charmin
Edwards comments on the Black American
issues.  I cannot understand why Black women
are upset over this! Black women created the
demand. I just pray as you begin to fall in love
with YOUR OWN HAIR, this other hair will become a
way of a New look for vacation and not a way of
life. The community itself is not healthy. When
black people begin to see themselves as Americans
then and only then will the shift begin.I
have seen with my own eyes the piss poor places
that folks go just to get something to eat in
their neighborhood. The only place you can enter,
wash your hands and sit down to eat is our own
restaurants. You do your best to treat folk with
love, hot food and a place to sit only to get
talked about. You see, until black folk know that
life is not a sneaker and a fake purse, only then
will folk invest in the quality and invest in
themselves.

We have done a horrible job of
preparing our children on leaving a legacy. Teach
your children how to love. Say loving kind words
to your kids. Calling a baby “MF” sets him up for
ignorance! Prepare their minds early so they will
feel the fire and seek a Minority Business. Become
a teacher when a person walks through your door.
Explain why we must build and leave legacies of
love and prosperity. To those of you too full of
yourself, do not be fooled. Travon Martin was
clearly a child whose parents poured so much love
into…. Never forget how the world sees you.
Reach out and up to help someone who looks just
like you!! May the healing begin!

Michelle
Carter
Editor

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top

Featured
Article
 

Black Women on Quest
to Strip Asian
Dominance

Princess Hill
and Kelly
Williams

The
economic disparities that have crippled most of
our country have shown very little effect on the
$15 billion black
beauty industry that consists of a 96%
African-American customer base, but roughly only
3% of the retailers are
African-American. 
Real Estate
investor, Princess Hill, and award-winning
competition and master stylist, Kelly Williams
have decided it is time to open their own beauty
supply store in Detroit and empower others to
fight the dominance of the Asians. Click
here
to read about their journey.
Michelle
Carter
Editor

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top